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It’s been 27 years since an incumbent U.S. president lost re-election, and judging by the health of the economy and other traditional metrics, Donald Trump looks unlikely to break the trend.

In addition to presiding over sustained growth and low unemployment, Trump enjoys a nation at relative peace, a well-funded campaign and the strong backing of the Republican Party. And yet, as he prepares to formally kick off his 2020 re-election bid with a prime-time speech in Florida, he has reason to be circumspect, Shannon Pettypiece and Mike Dorning report.

Most private forecasters expect the economy to slow entering the election year, as U.S. trade disputes threaten global commerce — hurting core voters like farmers — and the fiscal stimulus from Trump’s 2018 tax cut fades.

Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into election meddling by Russia, alongside other controversies that have dogged Trump’s administration, are also potential liabilities.

Trump trails six of his Democratic rivals in hypothetical head-to-head contests, a poll showed last week. And no president since 1952 has been re-elected with an approval rating below 48%. Trump has not exceeded 46% in Gallup polls since taking office.

Much hinges on the Democrats. The question is whether they can select a challenger able to attract the funding and support in battleground states needed to deny Trump a second term.

Global Headlines

Iran under pressure | The Pentagon plans to send about 1,000 more troops to the Middle East, even as Trump described as “very minor” the recent attacks on two tankers in the Gulf of Oman that the U.S. has blamed on Iran. The Pentagon also released new photos and a timeline it said bolstered the case that Iran was behind the incidents. Tehran denies any involvement.

Click here to read how Trump’s campaign vow to get the U.S. out of costly foreign entanglements is colliding with the messy reality of commitments in the Middle East.

Trade turmoil | The chairwoman of the world’s biggest bicycle maker delivered an ominous message to China that its days as a global manufacturing hub may be numbered. Giant Manufacturing started rolling production of its U.S.-bound orders back home to Taiwan when Trump made his tariff threats last year, Cindy Wang reports. Trump’s top trade envoy, Robert Lighthizer, is due to appear before Congress this week to account for the trade conflict.

Scottish dilemma | Scots didn’t vote for Brexit and neither did they elect the Conservatives. So the likelihood of a Brexiteer such as Boris Johnson winning the race to succeed Theresa May as Tory leader and prime minister is forcing some hard choices north of the border. As Alan Crawford and Rodney Jefferson report, the sense in Edinburgh is that another referendum on Scottish independence is now inevitable.

As the Conservative field narrows further today, Alex Morales profiles Rory Stewart, the lesser-known candidate suddenly making waves.

Fall from grace | The holding company of the Brazilian construction and energy giant at the center of a massive Latin America graft probe has filed for bankruptcy protection. Odebrecht has struggled since the “Carwash” investigation, which started in 2014 and brought the construction industry to a halt as access to government projects was cut and executives jailed. The political fallout is still reverberating from Ecuador to Mexico, Peru and Brazil.

Waiting game | Democratic Republic of Congo President Felix Tshisekedi still hasn’t named a cabinet five months after taking office, leaving investors in the mineral-rich nation facing endless delays. After a disputed election, Tshisekedi’s protracted talks with his coalition partner have almost paralyzed a nation ranked by the World Bank as one of the most difficult and corrupt places to do business.

What to Watch

Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam today apologized for backing a bill to allow extraditions to China, as she seeks to defuse protests that have rocked the city. She declined to resign or withdraw the bill completely — key demands of protest leaders. Rights groups have urged a transparent probe into the death of Mohamed Mursi, the Muslim Brotherhood foot soldier who became Egypt’s first freely elected civilian president. He collapsed during a court hearing over an espionage case, with state-run media saying he suffered a “sudden heart attack.” Chancellor Angela Merkel’s candidate to head the European Commission — Manfred Weber, a German lawmaker in the European parliament — is struggling for momentum, which means she may need to instead focus on getting her preferred person into the European Central Bank’s top job. U.S. Secretary of State Michael Pompeo meets today with European Union foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini in Washington. Mogherini said yesterday the EU will not support Jared Kushner’s Middle East peace plan without a two-state solution included.

And finally…You used to catch only rare glimpses of them in public — a waiter willing to risk jail time might accept them for the right price, street hawkers making offers for them under their breath. Today, U.S. greenbacks are widely used in Venezuela’s supermarkets and bodegas. As Andrew Rosati reports, with the bolivar devalued into irrelevance by Nicolas Maduro’s regime, the cash printed by the gringos he rails against is king. 

 

–With assistance from Karl Maier and Jon Herskovitz.

To contact the author of this story: Kathleen Hunter in London at khunter9@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Rosalind Mathieson at rmathieson3@bloomberg.net, Alan Crawford

bloomberg.com” data-reactid=”35″>For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

Is War With Iran In Our Future? As Tensions Rise What Do You Think Trump’s Next Move Should Be?

Iran-US tension rises as Pentagon OKs sending more troops to Middle East and Rep. Omar blames Trump
Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn, one of Congress’ most vocal critics of President Trump, placed the blame squarely on the White House after Iran announced it could enrich uranium up to 20 percent — just a step below weapons-grade level. Omar took to Twitter on Monday condemning Trump’s See More decision to pull out of the Iran nuclear deal shortly before the Pentagon approved sending 1,000 more troops to the Middle East in response to the attack.

“None of this would be happening if Trump didn’t back out of the Iran nuclear deal,” she tweeted. Omar said the U.S. should get back to negotiations with Tehran and reinstate the Iran nuclear deal. The tension between the U.S. and Iran has been increasing in recent days after a high-profile attack on two oil tankers in the Strait of Hormuz. The U.S. blamed Iran for the attacks, which the country denied. U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) released new images Monday showing the aftermath of attacks, including some images purporting to show Iranian forces removing an unexploded device from the hull of one of the vessels.

Trump threatens to remove ‘millions’ of illegal immigrants starting next week
President Trump late Monday announced on Twitter that U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) will begin the process of “removing the millions of illegal aliens who have illicitly found their way into the U.S.,” but did not elaborate on what new measures will be taken. “They will be removed as fast as they come,” Trump wrote. Mike Morgan, the acting director of ICE, did not announce any new initiatives during his stop in Louisville on Sunday, where he spoke about the humanitarian and national security crisis at the border.

Trump re-election campaign set to officially launch at Orlando rally
President Trump is expected to officially kick off his re-election campaign at a rally in Orlando, Fla. Tuesday night, and supporters have been lining up for days. Trump voters started gathering outside Orlando’s Amway Center more than 40 hours before the event is scheduled to start. The president tweeted on Monday morning that his campaign has received more than 100,000 ticket requests for the event in an arena that only holds 20,000 people.Tune in to Fox News tonight at 8 p.m. ET for live coverage of Trump’s rally.

New Jersey man the latest American tourist to die in the Dominican Republic: Report
The State Department has confirmed to Fox News that another American tourist has died in the Dominican Republic. Reportedly, it was a New Jersey man who was found dead on his hotel room floor. Joseph Allen, 55, of Avenel, New Jersey, was found dead last Thursday morning, WABC reported. The popular Caribbean vacation destination has been grappling with a rash of deaths of U.S. tourists in their hotel rooms at various resorts. Of the seven other recent deaths that have become publicly known, Dominican investigators said five were caused by a heart attack.

Parkland shooting survivor apologizes for racist comments after Harvard rescinds his admission offer
The conservative Parkland shooting survivor and pro-Second Amendment activist who was dropped by Harvard University after past offensive remarks and racial slurs surfaced appeared Monday on “The Story with Martha MacCallum,” where he apologized and asked for forgiveness. “I’m extremely sorry for it and I wish I could take it back but I can’t,” Kyle Kashuv told guest host Ed Henry. “All I can do now is seek to right the wrong.” Kashuv revealed on Twitter that Harvard rescinded his admission after the remarks he made as a 16-year-old came to light. The student, now 18, called comments “offensive,” “idiotic” and “inflammatory” and said he made them before the mass shooting — which transformed him as a person.

TODAY’S MUST-READS
Fox News contributor Lawrence Jones faces racist taunts from protesters at ‘Impeach Trump’ rally.
Paul Manafort not going to Rikers Island, will remain in federal custody after DOJ rejects move, source say.
2019 MTV Movie & TV Awards list of winners | Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson’s moving speech.

MINDING YOUR BUSINESS
How Gloria Vanderbilt became a designer jeans pioneer, fashion industry leader.
China’s Huawei gives Fox rare look inside headquarters amid US ban.
Facebook cryptocurrency launch: Why ‘Libra’ could be worth billions.

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Is War With Iran In Our Future? As Tensions Rise What Do You Think Trump’s Next Move Should Be?

Iran-US tension rises as Pentagon OKs sending more troops to Middle East and Rep. Omar blames Trump
Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn, one of Congress’ most vocal critics of President Trump, placed the blame squarely on the White House after Iran announced it could enrich uranium up to 20 percent — just a step below weapons-grade level. Omar took to Twitter on Monday condemning Trump’s See More decision to pull out of the Iran nuclear deal shortly before the Pentagon approved sending 1,000 more troops to the Middle East in response to the attack.

“None of this would be happening if Trump didn’t back out of the Iran nuclear deal,” she tweeted. Omar said the U.S. should get back to negotiations with Tehran and reinstate the Iran nuclear deal. The tension between the U.S. and Iran has been increasing in recent days after a high-profile attack on two oil tankers in the Strait of Hormuz. The U.S. blamed Iran for the attacks, which the country denied. U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) released new images Monday showing the aftermath of attacks, including some images purporting to show Iranian forces removing an unexploded device from the hull of one of the vessels.

Trump threatens to remove ‘millions’ of illegal immigrants starting next week
President Trump late Monday announced on Twitter that U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) will begin the process of “removing the millions of illegal aliens who have illicitly found their way into the U.S.,” but did not elaborate on what new measures will be taken. “They will be removed as fast as they come,” Trump wrote. Mike Morgan, the acting director of ICE, did not announce any new initiatives during his stop in Louisville on Sunday, where he spoke about the humanitarian and national security crisis at the border.

Trump re-election campaign set to officially launch at Orlando rally
President Trump is expected to officially kick off his re-election campaign at a rally in Orlando, Fla. Tuesday night, and supporters have been lining up for days. Trump voters started gathering outside Orlando’s Amway Center more than 40 hours before the event is scheduled to start. The president tweeted on Monday morning that his campaign has received more than 100,000 ticket requests for the event in an arena that only holds 20,000 people.Tune in to Fox News tonight at 8 p.m. ET for live coverage of Trump’s rally.

New Jersey man the latest American tourist to die in the Dominican Republic: Report
The State Department has confirmed to Fox News that another American tourist has died in the Dominican Republic. Reportedly, it was a New Jersey man who was found dead on his hotel room floor. Joseph Allen, 55, of Avenel, New Jersey, was found dead last Thursday morning, WABC reported. The popular Caribbean vacation destination has been grappling with a rash of deaths of U.S. tourists in their hotel rooms at various resorts. Of the seven other recent deaths that have become publicly known, Dominican investigators said five were caused by a heart attack.

Parkland shooting survivor apologizes for racist comments after Harvard rescinds his admission offer
The conservative Parkland shooting survivor and pro-Second Amendment activist who was dropped by Harvard University after past offensive remarks and racial slurs surfaced appeared Monday on “The Story with Martha MacCallum,” where he apologized and asked for forgiveness. “I’m extremely sorry for it and I wish I could take it back but I can’t,” Kyle Kashuv told guest host Ed Henry. “All I can do now is seek to right the wrong.” Kashuv revealed on Twitter that Harvard rescinded his admission after the remarks he made as a 16-year-old came to light. The student, now 18, called comments “offensive,” “idiotic” and “inflammatory” and said he made them before the mass shooting — which transformed him as a person.

TODAY’S MUST-READS
Fox News contributor Lawrence Jones faces racist taunts from protesters at ‘Impeach Trump’ rally.
Paul Manafort not going to Rikers Island, will remain in federal custody after DOJ rejects move, source say.
2019 MTV Movie & TV Awards list of winners | Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson’s moving speech.

MINDING YOUR BUSINESS
How Gloria Vanderbilt became a designer jeans pioneer, fashion industry leader.
China’s Huawei gives Fox rare look inside headquarters amid US ban.
Facebook cryptocurrency launch: Why ‘Libra’ could be worth billions.

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NBA: Toronto Raptors-Championship Parade
Jun 17, 2019; Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Toronto Raptors guard Kyle Lowry and team mates show off the Larry O’Brien trophy to fans during a parade through downtown Toronto to celebrate their NBA title. Mandatory Credit: Dan Hamilton-USA TODAY Sports

June 18, 2019

Four people sustained non-life-threatening gunshot wounds at Monday’s rally celebrating the Raptors’ championship, Toronto Police Chief Mark Saunders said.

Three arrests were made, according to Saunders, who added that the investigation was ongoing.

A reported 1.5 million parked Toronto’s downtown for the Raptors’ parade and subsequent rally at City Hall. The shootings occurred at Nathan Phillips Square, adjacent to City Hall. Addition people sustained minor injuries attempting to flee the scene after the shots were heard.

Mayor John Tory said in a statement, “It is disappointing and I’m sure a source of anger for more than just me that anyone would carry a gun and discharge it at what was otherwise a joyous celebration.”

–While the Raptors celebrated, the next chapter for the team sits in limbo based on the future of star forward Kawhi Leonard.

“Holding that trophy, there’s nothing more special than that,” Ed Rogers, chairman of Rogers Communications, partial owner of the Raptors, said at the rally. “The three of us are going to do everything we can to not make this a one-year thing, but make this a dynasty.”

Leonard will opt out of the final year of his contract to become a free agent. The Raptors expected this bit of paperwork even before Leonard was acquired from the San Antonio Spurs last summer. What they won’t know until at least June 30 is whether Leonard ever will wear a Toronto uniform again, and Leonard declined to offer any hints Monday.

–Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey said he isn’t concerned by reports of tension between James Harden and Chris Paul.

In a wide-ranging interview on ESPN Radio, Morey also disputed reports that Paul has asked to be traded and confirmed that he intends to come to contract terms with head coach Mike D’Antoni. As to an ESPN story that said there’s unrest between All-Stars Harden and Paul, Morey said the frustration stems from a desire to win.

“Two competitive superstars at that level, there’s going to be times when they are extremely competitive, extremely focused on how do we get to that next level, and when we don’t, there’s going to be frustration,” Morey said. “I’m frustrated, our top players are frustrated, Mike D’Antoni is frustrated. We want to take the last step and be the champion, and I think it’s good that there is tension in the sense that we all want to win.”

–The New Orleans Pelicans picked up the 2020-21 option for head coach Alvin Gentry, putting him under contract for the next two seasons.

Gentry, 64, has spent the past four seasons coaching the Pelicans, going 145-183 and leading the team to the second round of the playoffs in 2017-18.

The Pelicans went 33-49 this season. Anthony Davis requested a trade in the middle of the campaign and sat out or had his minutes limited for much of the second half.

–Pelicans forward Julius Randle will opt out of his $9.1 million player option for 2019-20, The Athletic reported.

The 6-foot-9 Randle signed a one-year contract with the Pelicans last summer that included the player option for 2019-20. With his expected opt-out, Randle and the Pelicans could negotiate a new deal, or Randle could pursue another team.

The Pelicans agreed to trade All-NBA star Davis to the Los Angeles Lakers for a hefty return of players and draft picks earlier this week. They now have the No. 1 and 4 overall picks in Thursday night’s draft, and they are expected to select Duke’s Zion Williamson with the top pick.

–Forward Rondae Hollis-Jefferson will be an unrestricted free agent this offseason after the Brooklyn Nets declined to make a qualifying offer, ESPN reported.

Hollis-Jefferson later tweeted: “Brooklynnnnn I Love You.. can’t believe it’s been 4 years ha.. Thank you”

Hollis-Jefferson, 24, averaged 9.9 points and 5.9 rebounds in four years with the Nets, who acquired him in a draft-night trade after the Portland Trail Blazers selected him with the 23rd pick in the 2015 draft. He started 147 of 234 games in Brooklyn, averaging a career-best 13.9 points in 2017-18.

–Field Level Media

Source: OANN

A Huawei company logo is seen at the Shenzhen International Airport in Shenzhen in Shenzhen
A Huawei company logo is seen at the Shenzhen International Airport in Shenzhen in Shenzhen, Guangdong province, China June 17, 2019. REUTERS/Aly Song

June 18, 2019

By Sijia Jiang

HONG KONG (Reuters) – China’s Huawei Technologies Co Ltd has taken a harder-than-expected hit from a U.S. ban, the company’s founder and CEO Ren Zhengfei said, and slashed revenue expectations for the year.

Ren’s downbeat assessment that the ban will hit revenue by $30 billion, the first time Huawei has quantified the impact of the U.S. action, comes as a surprise after weeks of defiant comments from company executives who maintained Huawei was technologically self-sufficient.

The United States has put Huawei on an export blacklist citing national security issues, barring U.S. suppliers from selling to the world’s largest telecommunications equipment maker and No.2 maker of smartphones, without special approval.

The firm has denied its products pose a security threat.

The ban has forced companies, including Alphabet Inc’s Google and British chip designer ARM to limit or cease their relationships with the Chinese company.

Huawei had not expected that U.S. determination to “crack” the company would be “so strong and so pervasive”, Ren said, speaking at the company’s Shenzhen headquarters on Monday.

Two U.S. tech experts, George Gilder and Nicholas Negroponte, also joined the session.

“We did not expect they would attack us on so many aspects,” Ren said, adding he expects a revival in business in 2021.

“We cannot get components supply, cannot participate in many international organizations, cannot work closely with many universities, cannot use anything with U.S. components, and cannot even establish connection with networks that use such components.”

Huawei, which turned in a revenue of 721.2 billion yuan ($104 billion) last year, expects revenue of around $100 billion this year and the next, Ren said. This compares to an initial target for a growth in 2019 to between $125 billion and $130 billion depending on foreign exchange fluctuations.

TRADE WAR

The Trump administration slapped sanctions on Huawei at a time when U.S.-China trade talks hit rough waters, prompting assertions from China’s leaders about the country’s progress in achieving self-sufficiency in the key semiconductor business.

Huawei has also said it could roll out its Hongmeng operating system (OS), which is being tested, within nine months if needed, as its phones face being cut off from updates of Google’s Android OS in the wake of the ban.

But industry insiders have remained skeptical that Chinese chip makers can quickly meet the challenge of supplying Huawei’s needs and those of other domestic technology firms.

Negroponte, founder of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab, said the U.S. ban was a mistake.

“Our president has already said publicly that he would reconsider Huawei if we can make a trade deal. So clearly that is not about national security,” he said.

“It is about something else,” Negroponte added.

Huawei’s smartphone sales have, however, been hit by the uncertainty. Ren said the firm’s international smartphone shipments plunged 40%. While he did not give the time period, a spokesman clarified the CEO was referring to the past month.

Bloomberg reported on Sunday that Huawei was preparing for a 40-60% drop in international smartphone shipments.

The CEO, however, said Huawei will not cut research and development spending despite the expected hit from the ban to the company’s finances and would not have large-scale layoffs.

($1 = 6.9239 Chinese yuan)

(Reporting by Sijia Jiang in Hong Kong and Brenda Goh in Shanghai; Writing by Sayantani Ghosh; Editing by Himani Sarkar and Muralikumar Anantharaman)

Source: OANN

FILE PHOTO: Ships and shipping containers are pictured at the port of Long Beach in Long Beach, California
FILE PHOTO: Ships and shipping containers are pictured at the port of Long Beach in Long Beach, California, U.S., January 30, 2019. REUTERS/Mike Blake

June 17, 2019

By Jonathan Saul

LONDON (Reuters) – A group of leading banks will for the first time include efforts to cut carbon dioxide emissions in their decision making when providing shipping company loans, executives said on Tuesday.

International shipping accounts for 2.2% of global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and the U.N.’s International Maritime Organization (IMO), has a long-term goal to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 50% from 2008 levels by 2050.

Working with non-profit organisations the Global Maritime Forum, the Rocky Mountain Institute and London University’s UCL Energy Institute, 11 banks have established a framework to measure the carbon intensity of shipping finance portfolios.

The banks involved in the “Poseidon Principles” initiative, which will set a common baseline to assess whether lending portfolios are in line or behind the adopted climate goals set by the IMO, represent around a fifth or $100 billion of the total global shipping finance portfolio.

The results will be published annually in individual sustainability reports and the data will be obtained by banks from borrowers under existing loan agreements.

Although the IMO agreed stricter energy efficiency targets last month for certain types of ships, environmental campaigners are calling for tougher goals.

“We are helping the shipping industry emerge into the 21st century in a responsible way,” Michael Parker, global head of shipping at Citigroup, told Reuters.

‘HUGE ROLE’

Those involved so far are Citigroup, Societe Generale, DNB, ABN Amro, Amsterdam Trade Bank, Credit Agricole CIB, Danish Ship Finance, Danske Bank, DVB, ING and Nordea.

“Banks have a huge role to play here because there is about $450 billion of senior debt that the world’s shipping banks and Chinese lessors grant to the sector and about 70,000 commercial vessels,” Paul Taylor, global head of shipping & offshore with Societe Generale CIB, said.

Banks will in the longer term be more selective about which ships they include in their lending portfolios, bankers said.

“Will there be companies that will find it difficult to get finance as they have less efficient ships, yes, it will be a consequence of it – but it’s not going to be used to look for those companies and somehow find a way of getting them out,” Citigroup’s Parker said.

Oivind Haraldsen, Danske Bank’s global head of shipping, said more institutions would join the efforts to cut the carbon footprint of the sector.

“All of us have to push – we as banks probably have more power than we are aware,” he said.

(Editing by Alexander Smith)

Source: OANN

FILE PHOTO: Egypt's deposed president Mohamed Mursi greets his lawyers and people from behind bars at a court wearing the red uniform of a prisoner sentenced to death, during his court appearance with Muslim Brotherhood members on the outskirts of Cairo
FILE PHOTO: Egypt’s deposed president Mohamed Mursi greets his lawyers and people from behind bars at a court wearing the red uniform of a prisoner sentenced to death, during his court appearance with Muslim Brotherhood members on the outskirts of Cairo, Egypt, June 21, 2015. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh/File Photo

June 17, 2019

By Nadine Awadalla and Enas al-Ashray

CAIRO (Reuters) – Former Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi, the first democratically elected head of state in Egypt’s modern history, died on Monday aged 67 after collapsing in a Cairo court while on trial on espionage charges, authorities said.

Mursi, a top figure in the now-banned Muslim Brotherhood, had been in jail since being toppled by the military in 2013 after barely a year in power, following mass protests against his rule.

His death is likely to pile up international pressure on the Egyptian government over its human rights record, especially conditions in prisons where thousands of Islamists and secular activists are held.

The public prosecutor said he had collapsed in a defendants’ cage in the courtroom shortly after addressing the court, and had been pronounced dead in hospital at 4:50 p.m. (1450 GMT). It said initial checks had shown no signs of recent injury on his body.

The Muslim Brotherhood described Mursi’s death as a “full-fledged murder” and called for masses to gather at his funeral in Egypt and outside Egyptian embassies around the world.

Mursi’s family previously said his health had deteriorated in prison and that they were rarely allowed to visit.

His son, Abdullah Mohamed Mursi, told Reuters that the family had not been contacted about the details of the burial and were only communicating with the family through their lawyers.

Mursi’s son had said earlier that authorities were refusing to allow him to be laid to rest in the family burial grounds in his native Nile Delta province of Sharqiya.

“We know nothing about him and no one is in touch with us, and we don’t know if we are going to wash him or say a prayer to him or not,” he said.

Amnesty International called for an “impartial, thorough and transparent” investigation into Mursi’s death.

“The news of Mohamed Mursi’s death in court today is deeply shocking and raises serious questions about his treatment in custody,” the group said in a statement. “Egyptian authorities had the responsibility to ensure that, as a detainee, he had access to proper medical care.”

British MP Crispin Blunt, who had led a delegation of UK lawmakers and lawyers last year in putting out a report on Mursi’s detention, slammed the conditions of Mursi’s incarceration.

“We want to understand whether there was any change in his conditions since we reported in March 2018, and if he continued to be held in the conditions we found, then I’m afraid the Egyptian government are likely to be responsible for his premature death,” he said in remarks to the BBC.

DECADES OF REPRESSION

After decades of repression under Egyptian autocrats, the Brotherhood won a parliamentary election after a popular uprising toppled Hosni Mubarak and his military-backed establishment in 2011.

Mursi was elected to power in 2012 in Egypt’s first free presidential election, having been thrown into the race at the last moment by the disqualification on a technicality of millionaire businessman Khairat al-Shater, by far the Brotherhood’s preferred choice.

His victory marked a radical break with the military men who had provided every Egyptian leader since the overthrow of the monarchy in 1952.

Mursi promised a moderate Islamist agenda to steer Egypt into a new democratic era in which autocracy would be replaced by transparent government that respected human rights and revived the fortunes of a powerful Arab state long in decline.

But the euphoria that greeted the end of an era of presidents who ruled like pharaohs did not last long.

The stocky, bespectacled engineer, born in 1951 in the dying days of the monarchy, told Egyptians he would deliver an “Egyptian renaissance with an Islamic foundation.”

Instead, he alienated millions who accused him of usurping unlimited powers, imposing the Brotherhood’s conservative brand of Islam and mismanaging the economy, all of which he denied.

STATE OF ALERT

Security sources said the Interior Ministry had declared a state of alert on Monday, notably in Sharqiya.

Mursi had been in court for a hearing on charges of espionage emanating from suspected contacts with the Palestinian Islamist group Hamas, which had close ties to the Brotherhood.

A source who was in the court at the time told Reuters that Mursi spoke for around 15 minutes and concluded with a line of poetry about his love for Egypt, before collapsing as the other defendants began banging on the soundproof cage.

His body was taken to the Tora prison hospital, state television reported. A heavy security presence was outside the prison on Monday night.

Mursi’s lawyer said his health had been poor in jail. “We had put in several requests for treatment, some were accepted and others were not,” the lawyer, Abdel-Menem Abdel-Maqsood, told Reuters.

Mursi was serving a 20-year prison sentence for a conviction arising from the killing of protesters during demonstrations in 2012, and a life sentence for espionage in a case related to the Gulf state of Qatar. He had denied the charges.

Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan mourned his fellow Islamist as a martyr.

“Putting doubts aside, he has become a martyr today with the fulfillment of God’s order. … Our prayers are with him,” Erdogan said.

“Condolences to all my brothers who walked the same path as he did. Condolences to the people of Egypt. Condolences to his family and those close to him.”

The Palestinian Islamist group Hamas said Mursi had “served Egypt and the (Muslim) nation and the Palestinian cause.”

Qatar’s emir, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, a backer of Mursi and his Brotherhood, tweeted his condolences to Mursi’s family “and to the brotherly Egyptian people.”

Egyptian state media carried brief reports of Mursi’s death that made no mention of his former position as president.

(Reporting by Nayera Abdullah and Enas al-Ashray; Additional reporting by Ahmed Mohamed Hassan and Haithem Ahmed in Cairo, Nidal al-Mughrabi in Gaza and Ali Kucukgocmen in Turkey; Writing by Nadine Awadalla and Sami Aboudi; Editing by Kevin Liffey, Toby Chopra and Richard Chang)

Source: OANN


Why have national Democrats and not national Republicans fallen under the tyranny of the 70-somethings? It seems so contrary to common expectation. Democrats are, as they often remind us, the party of progress and the future. The question seems to rival those enduring, unanswerable mysteries such as “What happens when you die?” and “Why did Mick Taylor quit the Rolling Stones?”

People in their mid-to-late 70s are thick on the ground nowadays, while in an earlier era, of course, you’d have been more likely to find them under it. This is especially true in the urban centers of the Northeast and mid-Atlantic, according to a recent survey of census data by the Associated Press–NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. In particular, the Washington, D.C., area is a leader in “senior labor force participation,” by which the researchers mean the region is loaded with people who have passed the age of retirement yet somehow neglected to retire.

Look no further than the Democratic caucus on Capitol Hill. For whatever reason—perhaps they’re more easily bored by government work, or perhaps they’re more eager to cash in on government work—Republicans have less of a 70-something problem. House Republicans are relatively youthful, in chronology if not in disposition: They are led by a trio ages 54, 53, and 52. Indeed, the only 70-something among the GOP leadership on the Hill is the 77-year-old Mitch McConnell (I’m omitting the constitutional office of president pro tempore of the Senate, now occupied by the Republican Chuck Grassley, who is 85 but doesn’t look a day over 86.)

Going down the ranks, the public-affairs software firm Quorum reckoned that the average age of the Democratic House leadership is 72, fully 24 years more than the average of the Republican House leadership. Infamously, the three leading Democrats in the House are 79, 78, and 79, for a staggering combined age of 236, making the Democratic leadership team older, in aggregate, than the Constitution itself.

The party’s congressional gerontocracy has now inevitably bled into the field of presidential candidates. The front-runner, Joe Biden, is 76. Second place, according to most polls, belongs to Bernie Sanders, who’s a year older than Biden. They hope to replace the oldest man ever to be elected president. He’s younger than both of them. If either Biden or Sanders gets to the White House and then wins a second term, we will be governed by a man in his early 80s, nearly two decades older than Franklin D. Roosevelt was when, having won his fourth term, he pegged out from overwork. Needless to say, Sanders and Biden are each much spryer than FDR. Imagine Dick Van Dyke from Mary Poppins Returns clicking his heels in the Oval Office.

To be sure, anyone who criticizes our gerontocracy must insert a “to be sure” paragraph right about now, praising the gumption and resilience of our oldsters, marveling at their energy and their bottomless reservoirs of wisdom. Stipulated! Nancy Pelosi, Steny Hoyer, Biden, and Sanders—and especially the McDonald’s-loving 72-year-old incumbent—are walking testaments to the advances made by geriatric medicine since the 1950s, when they were teenagers. The idea that with length of days comes wisdom is a commonplace of our patrimony, from Aristotle and Job to Shakespeare and Austen. And all the flattering things we are required to say about old age and the people caught up in it do serve as a much-needed counterbalance to our culture’s childish obsession with youth.

But this traditional picture of old age as the repository of wisdom comes with certain complications. Gerontocracy is rule by people who insist on turning the peak of their career into a plateau. Aristotle and the others acknowledged that it carries hidden and insidious effects, and reveals unflattering qualities in the gerontocrats themselves. We can see this most obviously in the effect it has had on the Democratic Party generationally. There is a huge gap between where the energy and creativity of the party lie, with a group of dynamic activists and House members in their 30s and even their 20s (thank you, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez), and the ruling class of 70-somethings layered far above like a crumbling porte cochere.

In the farm system that trains and seasons the leaders of tomorrow—assuming tomorrow ever comes—that gap signifies a lost generation. One day, presumably, power within the party will pass, and when it does, if present trends continue, it will leapfrog from seniors born around the time of V-J Day to people who can barely remember 9/11. More likely than not, members of Generation X will never get their turn—an entire cohort condemned to the fate of Prince Charles. After the indignities that Boomers inflicted on Generation X, from disco to postmodern literary theory, this scarcely seems fair.

The situation pushes some Gen Xers to take extreme measures. The far-fetched presidential campaigns of backbenchers such as Tim Ryan and Seth Moulton are best understood as cries for help, as ambitious young politicians try to free themselves from the professional bottleneck created by unbudgeable leadership.

Some 70-somethings are easier to forgive than others. Pelosi and her team are simply aging in place, clinging to a version of the jobs they’ve held for a decade or more; inertia could be as much to blame for their refusal to move along as an unslakable thirst for power and attention. There’s less to forgive in the actions of Biden and Sanders. Three years ago, both were given the chance to leave the field gracefully. But they. Will. Not. Go. Away.

Sanders, holding political positions virtually identical to those of his rivals, offered a less plausible case for his candidacy than Biden did. Biden’s case, which you could strain to make if you were willing to risk a herniated disk, was ideological: He filled a slot that no one else would fill. He was carrying the pragmatic liberalism of an earlier time into a scrum of leftish contenders who believe that pragmatism is for chumps.

That case was dashed last week with Biden’s head-snapping reversal of his 40-year support of the Hyde Amendment, which bars the use of federal funds to pay for abortion. Far from serving as an alternative to the radicalism of one segment of his party, Biden showed that he is willing to be its slave—if that’s what it takes to win approval for his dream of apotheosis. Such groveling is unlovely enough in people in the robust prime of life; it is doubly so in old people, who, by virtue of their age and experience, are supposed to know their own mind.

The only cure for the desire to be president, a wise politician once said, is embalming fluid. Let’s stipulate to that, too. We all need purpose and meaning in life. The trick for old folks is to adjust their search for purpose and meaning as they follow nature’s course and give way to their juniors. The avenues to self-fulfillment that were open to them as younger men and women are now the rightful territory of a newer generation, and dignity requires them to find other paths of service and satisfaction.

I can easily imagine a host of dignified futures for our 70-something presidential candidates, far from New Hampshire and Iowa. Sanders could work as a tour guide in Nicaragua or a docent on fundraising cruises for The New York Review of Books. Biden, for his part, could take on the once-popular, now-neglected role of “elder statesman,” happy to serve when called to a blue-ribbon panel or as a special envoy to trouble spots here and there, to offer advice when his advice is sought, and otherwise to lead a life of recreation, reading, and contemplation. No one will think less of either of them.

Instead, they have chosen the way of vanity and self-indulgence, to the detriment of the political cause they say they want to advance. Sanders and Biden have made themselves the equivalent of the old dude cruising the pool at Club Med in his sagging Speedo, capped teeth gleaming, knobby shoulders and fallen pecs bronzed and shiny with tanning oil, gold chains twinkling through the chest hair. I’m not saying one of them won’t succeed in his quest—though I have my doubts about both—but in a saner world, it would be obvious that the quest itself is unseemly. They do no credit to their peers with their refusal to acknowledge their natural and inevitable station in life. And they do no favors to the younger people—from Pete Buttigieg, age 37; to Kamala Harris, age 54; and even to Elizabeth Warren, age 69—who are eager, as they are entitled to be, to take their shot.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.


Why have national Democrats and not national Republicans fallen under the tyranny of the 70-somethings? It seems so contrary to common expectation. Democrats are, as they often remind us, the party of progress and the future. The question seems to rival those enduring, unanswerable mysteries such as “What happens when you die?” and “Why did Mick Taylor quit the Rolling Stones?”

People in their mid-to-late 70s are thick on the ground nowadays, while in an earlier era, of course, you’d have been more likely to find them under it. This is especially true in the urban centers of the Northeast and mid-Atlantic, according to a recent survey of census data by the Associated Press–NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. In particular, the Washington, D.C., area is a leader in “senior labor force participation,” by which the researchers mean the region is loaded with people who have passed the age of retirement yet somehow neglected to retire.

Look no further than the Democratic caucus on Capitol Hill. For whatever reason—perhaps they’re more easily bored by government work, or perhaps they’re more eager to cash in on government work—Republicans have less of a 70-something problem. House Republicans are relatively youthful, in chronology if not in disposition: They are led by a trio ages 54, 53, and 52. Indeed, the only 70-something among the GOP leadership on the Hill is the 77-year-old Mitch McConnell (I’m omitting the constitutional office of president pro tempore of the Senate, now occupied by the Republican Chuck Grassley, who is 85 but doesn’t look a day over 86.)

Going down the ranks, the public-affairs software firm Quorum reckoned that the average age of the Democratic House leadership is 72, fully 24 years more than the average of the Republican House leadership. Infamously, the three leading Democrats in the House are 79, 78, and 79, for a staggering combined age of 236, making the Democratic leadership team older, in aggregate, than the Constitution itself.

The party’s congressional gerontocracy has now inevitably bled into the field of presidential candidates. The front-runner, Joe Biden, is 76. Second place, according to most polls, belongs to Bernie Sanders, who’s a year older than Biden. They hope to replace the oldest man ever to be elected president. He’s younger than both of them. If either Biden or Sanders gets to the White House and then wins a second term, we will be governed by a man in his early 80s, nearly two decades older than Franklin D. Roosevelt was when, having won his fourth term, he pegged out from overwork. Needless to say, Sanders and Biden are each much spryer than FDR. Imagine Dick Van Dyke from Mary Poppins Returns clicking his heels in the Oval Office.

To be sure, anyone who criticizes our gerontocracy must insert a “to be sure” paragraph right about now, praising the gumption and resilience of our oldsters, marveling at their energy and their bottomless reservoirs of wisdom. Stipulated! Nancy Pelosi, Steny Hoyer, Biden, and Sanders—and especially the McDonald’s-loving 72-year-old incumbent—are walking testaments to the advances made by geriatric medicine since the 1950s, when they were teenagers. The idea that with length of days comes wisdom is a commonplace of our patrimony, from Aristotle and Job to Shakespeare and Austen. And all the flattering things we are required to say about old age and the people caught up in it do serve as a much-needed counterbalance to our culture’s childish obsession with youth.

But this traditional picture of old age as the repository of wisdom comes with certain complications. Gerontocracy is rule by people who insist on turning the peak of their career into a plateau. Aristotle and the others acknowledged that it carries hidden and insidious effects, and reveals unflattering qualities in the gerontocrats themselves. We can see this most obviously in the effect it has had on the Democratic Party generationally. There is a huge gap between where the energy and creativity of the party lie, with a group of dynamic activists and House members in their 30s and even their 20s (thank you, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez), and the ruling class of 70-somethings layered far above like a crumbling porte cochere.

In the farm system that trains and seasons the leaders of tomorrow—assuming tomorrow ever comes—that gap signifies a lost generation. One day, presumably, power within the party will pass, and when it does, if present trends continue, it will leapfrog from seniors born around the time of V-J Day to people who can barely remember 9/11. More likely than not, members of Generation X will never get their turn—an entire cohort condemned to the fate of Prince Charles. After the indignities that Boomers inflicted on Generation X, from disco to postmodern literary theory, this scarcely seems fair.

The situation pushes some Gen Xers to take extreme measures. The far-fetched presidential campaigns of backbenchers such as Tim Ryan and Seth Moulton are best understood as cries for help, as ambitious young politicians try to free themselves from the professional bottleneck created by unbudgeable leadership.

Some 70-somethings are easier to forgive than others. Pelosi and her team are simply aging in place, clinging to a version of the jobs they’ve held for a decade or more; inertia could be as much to blame for their refusal to move along as an unslakable thirst for power and attention. There’s less to forgive in the actions of Biden and Sanders. Three years ago, both were given the chance to leave the field gracefully. But they. Will. Not. Go. Away.

Sanders, holding political positions virtually identical to those of his rivals, offered a less plausible case for his candidacy than Biden did. Biden’s case, which you could strain to make if you were willing to risk a herniated disk, was ideological: He filled a slot that no one else would fill. He was carrying the pragmatic liberalism of an earlier time into a scrum of leftish contenders who believe that pragmatism is for chumps.

That case was dashed last week with Biden’s head-snapping reversal of his 40-year support of the Hyde Amendment, which bars the use of federal funds to pay for abortion. Far from serving as an alternative to the radicalism of one segment of his party, Biden showed that he is willing to be its slave—if that’s what it takes to win approval for his dream of apotheosis. Such groveling is unlovely enough in people in the robust prime of life; it is doubly so in old people, who, by virtue of their age and experience, are supposed to know their own mind.

The only cure for the desire to be president, a wise politician once said, is embalming fluid. Let’s stipulate to that, too. We all need purpose and meaning in life. The trick for old folks is to adjust their search for purpose and meaning as they follow nature’s course and give way to their juniors. The avenues to self-fulfillment that were open to them as younger men and women are now the rightful territory of a newer generation, and dignity requires them to find other paths of service and satisfaction.

I can easily imagine a host of dignified futures for our 70-something presidential candidates, far from New Hampshire and Iowa. Sanders could work as a tour guide in Nicaragua or a docent on fundraising cruises for The New York Review of Books. Biden, for his part, could take on the once-popular, now-neglected role of “elder statesman,” happy to serve when called to a blue-ribbon panel or as a special envoy to trouble spots here and there, to offer advice when his advice is sought, and otherwise to lead a life of recreation, reading, and contemplation. No one will think less of either of them.

Instead, they have chosen the way of vanity and self-indulgence, to the detriment of the political cause they say they want to advance. Sanders and Biden have made themselves the equivalent of the old dude cruising the pool at Club Med in his sagging Speedo, capped teeth gleaming, knobby shoulders and fallen pecs bronzed and shiny with tanning oil, gold chains twinkling through the chest hair. I’m not saying one of them won’t succeed in his quest—though I have my doubts about both—but in a saner world, it would be obvious that the quest itself is unseemly. They do no credit to their peers with their refusal to acknowledge their natural and inevitable station in life. And they do no favors to the younger people—from Pete Buttigieg, age 37; to Kamala Harris, age 54; and even to Elizabeth Warren, age 69—who are eager, as they are entitled to be, to take their shot.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.

A city that was thirsty to celebrate its first major professional sports title in more than a quarter century erupted in joy Monday, with tens of thousands of fans jammed on to the streets of downtown Toronto for the championship parade.

The parade was more than two hours behind schedule as the buses carrying the Raptors were held up by the massive amount of fans on the streets. Just after 2:20 p.m., the national anthem was played at Nathan Phillips Square with the crowd singing O Canada as the wait continued for the Raptors.

It was followed by a flyby from the Royal Canadian Air Force’s Snowbirds demonstration team.

The Raptors finally reached Nathan Phillips Square by 3 p.m., and the ceremony began about 30 minutes later.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW

The ceremony was delayed briefly as emcee Matt Devlin went on stage to urge the crowd to stay calm as police dealt with what he called an emergency.

Police tweeted that there were reports of a woman shot near the back of the square and people were running from area. Police later tweeted that they had found two victims with non life-threatening injuries. Two people were in custody and two firearms had been recovered.

The ceremony resumed by 3:55 p.m.

Earlier, Premier Doug Ford was roundly booed as he was introduced on the stage, while Prime Minister Justin Trudeau mostly received cheers.

The Raptors were introduced one by one during the ceremony, as most people in the square pulled out their smart phones, recording the ceremony on the stage.

Raptors superstar Kawhi Leonard came out last, serenaded with chants of “MVP, MVP, MVP!”

The fans then gave a rousing rendition of Queen’s “We Are The Champions” before the politicians began their speeches.

Toronto Raptors forward Kawhi Leonard holds the NBA Finals trophy at the victory parade Monday.

Mayor John Tory said the city would rename a part of Bremner Blvd. as Raptors Way. Tory also gave the team a key to the city, handing it to Leonard.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW

After the delay, the speeches continued from the team, including Raptors head coach Nick Nurse.

“I think it was Bono who said ‘the world needs more Canada,’ ” Nurse said to the crowd. “The world just got it!”

Raptors all-star guard Kyle Lowry was greeted with chants of “Lowry, Lowry.”

“We are now world champs together,” Lowry told the fans. “That’s all that really matters.”

Guard Fred VanVleet referenced the franchise’s past failures in the playoffs.

“You guys killed us when we got swept . . . you better celebrate this . . . all summer,” VanVleet said as the crowd roared.

Leonard, a two-time NBA Finals MVP, was introduced by Devlin as the “greatest player in the world.”

“Thank you, enjoy this moment and have fun with this,” said Leonard, who ended his brief remarks with “aha-ha-ha” — presumably mocking his infamous laugh from training camp — which had his teammates bursting with laughter.

Fans responded again by cheering “MVP, MVP, MVP!”

Raptors global ambassador Drake called this one of the most important shows of his life, and urged fans at the square to hug a stranger.

The ceremony wrapped up by about 4:20 p.m.

All day, chants of “Let’s go, Raptors” filled the square and the parade route as a huge crowd gathered to cheer on the team. Aerial footage from the parade showed spectacular shots of people jammed on the streets and in the square, which has a capacity of about 65,000.

The City of Toronto urged fans to head to Yonge-Dundas Square because Nathan Phillips Square was at capacity.

Commuters on public transit were surrounded by fans wearing Raptors gear, with the city swept up in excitement over the team’s NBA championship after defeating the Golden State Warriors last week.

The Burlington Post reported that local GO stations were mobbed as throngs of people commuted to Toronto to attend the parade. The TTC was forced to close Queen, Osgoode, Dundas stations just after 12:30 p.m. due to overcrowding at street level.

The Raptors travelled the parade route, which began at the Princes’ Gate at Exhibition Place, in five open-air double-decker buses. Lowry wore a Damon Stoudamire throwback jersey, a tribute to the franchise’s first superstar.

He was also carrying the Larry O’Brien Championship Trophy, given to the NBA champions.

Fans held signs urging Leonard, who could leave as a free agent at the end of the month, to stay with the Raptors.

A laughing Lowry led a chant of “five more years” for the fans to direct at Leonard as their bus slowly inched along the parade route, video from Yahoo Sports Canada shows.

One of the most clever signs was one that read “Board Man Gets Parade” a riff of what Leonard used to say in college (Board Man Gets Paid). Another sign read “Started from Bargnani, now we’re here.”

Leonard was smoking a cigar and wearing a shirt that said Board Man Gets Paid — his belief that to get into the NBA, you had to outwork an opponent because rebounds help you win games.

Amid the craziness as the procession headed to the square was a fan dubbed Plant Guy who handed over his “Kawh-actus” to Leonard as the crowd cheered. The plant was meant to be a “housewarming gift” to Leonard, in a video that went viral after the Raptors won.

All the streets near city hall were full of parents and their kids as well as men and women of all ages to celebrate a historic moment.

If you didn’t know Canada has legalized marijuana, you’re learning something in this crowd, the Star’s Laura Armstrong reports.

By noon, Toronto police said all viewing areas along the route of the Raptors parade were close to capacity, and urging fans to stay off the road so that the players and their floats can move along.

As Nathan Phillips Square filled to capacity, Toronto police tweeted that they’d set up a medical post on Bay St., just east of City Hall, for anyone feeling unwell.

Fire district chief Stephan Powell said firefighters were dealing with about a dozen calls for dehydration in the packed Nathan Phillips Square outside city hall.

Screenshot from Google Maps of the road closures due to the Raptors parade.

Toronto police Const. Jenifferjit Sidhu said several children were separated from their parents during the parade. She said police will bring the children to 52 Division to be reunited with their parents.

Sidhu said there were no reports of unruly fans or arrests.

Toronto police were trying to stop more people from entering the square. Some fans left, saying the crowd was getting rowdy.

Trudeau was with Raptors president Masai Ujiri at the square. Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer and NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh were also spotted in attendance.

Right in front of the stage at the square were three sisters from Hamilton, waiting patiently and anxiously for the celebrations to start at the square. They had been camping out here since 9 p.m. Sunday to ensure they have the best view of the players and celebrities.

“An epic moment,” said Christine Demesa, who along with her sisters Jen and Alexa were waving Raptors flags and donning NBA Champions hats.

“Turn up the music please. Let’s roll.”

Flags from Cameroon (where Pascal Siakam is from) and the Congo (for Serge Ibaka) could be spotted in the sea of people celebrating.

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Ronnie Gaffe said he drove in from Brampton and arrived in the city at 4 a.m.

“This is a chance of a lifetime,” he said as he recalled all the ups and downs he and other fans have been through for 25 years.

“I’m 55 and I was literally crying like a baby the night they won. So much emotions right now.”

There were safety concerns at the square as people climbed on to the arches to get a better view. Kids and people suffering from panic attacks were also pulled out of the crowd, the Star’s Bruce Arthur reports.

There were also safety concerns near the parade route, with cars pulled over on the Gardiner Expressway as motorists stopped and got out of their vehicles to watch the parade below on Lake Shore Blvd.

Read more:

Party first, contract later, Raptors’ Gasol says

The road to 16 wins: A series-by-series look at how the Toronto Raptors won their first NBA title

‘This isn’t real!’ Raptors fans camp out for championship parade

The area around the Princes’ Gates was jammed with fans jockeying for position, waiting to get a glimpse of their favourite players and the NBA championship trophy. The parade began there just before 10:30 a.m., and slowly headed to a rally at the square, scheduled to start at about 12:30 p.m.

The Fernandez family said they made the trip from Milton, and stayed at a nearby hotel Sunday night.

“It’s unbelievable,” said fan Aldrin Fernandes, while standing near the Princes’ Gates with his wife Tanya and children, Raphael, 7, and Shawn, 6.

“We couldn’t miss this moment because it could be once in a lifetime.”

Aldrin’s wife, Tanya, said the scene was “fantastic.”

“We’re going to follow the route as far as we can with the kids,” she said. “We’re super excited to get a glimpse of them.”

“I think we’re fans for life,” she added.

Mayor John Tory, who urged employers to give their workers time off to attend the celebrations, declared Monday “We The North Day” in Toronto.

Coronation Park, near Exhibition Place, hosted a viewing party to help relieve congestion.

The parade was scheduled to depart from the Princes’ Gates, heading east on Lake Shore Blvd., then north on York St. and University Ave. to Queen St. W., before ending at Nathan Phillips Square.

Lowry’s bus passed Bathurst St. at 12:10 p.m., so festivities were well behind schedule.

Raptors global ambassador Drake, who partied with the team in Las Vegas, was on one of the buses with Leonard, Lowry and VanVleet.

Another bus had Serge Ibaka, Jodie Meeks and Malcolm Miller.

Danny Green, Norman Powell and Chris Boucher were on another bus.

Bus No. 4 had Pascal Siakam, OG Anunoby and Patrick McCaw.

Bus No. 5 had Marc Gasol, Eric Moreland, Jeremy Lin and Jordan Loyd.

Superfan Nav Bhatia was the honorary parade marshal. Bhatia was at Princes’ Gate, snapping photos with fans as he rode around the grounds on a golf cart.

“It’s good for the city and good for the country,” said Bhatia, who said he was humbled by the outpouring of love for him.

“There is a lot of love flowing through here. This is amazing.”

The last time the city held a sports celebration of this magnitude was after the Toronto Blue Jays won the World Series in 1993. That parade saw fans climbing trees and statues on city streets to catch a glimpse of a team that included Joe Carter and Roberto Alomar.

Then-premier Bob Rae took part in those celebrations, flashing a sign that read “No speech today — Hooray for the Jays.” Current Premier Doug Ford has said he intends to watch this event with the masses.

His press secretary said Ford wants the day to be about the fans and players, not politicians.

The Golden State Warriors took a full-page ad in the Toronto Star on Monday to congratulate the Raptors on their NBA championship.

With files from The Canadian Press

Jason Miller is a breaking news reporter based in Toronto. Reach him on email: jasonmiller@thestar.ca or follow him on Twitter: @millermotionpic

Gilbert Ngabo is a breaking news reporter based in Toronto. Follow him on Twitter: @dugilbo


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