police

FILE PHOTO: Platini arrives at the Court of Arbitration for Sport in Lausanne
FILE PHOTO: Former UEFA President Michel Platini arrives at the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) to be heard in the arbitration procedure involving him and the FIFA in Lausanne, Switzerland, August 25, 2016. REUTERS/Pierre Albouy/File Photo

June 18, 2019

PARIS (Reuters) – Michel Platini, the former head of European football association UEFA, was detained and questioned by French police on Tuesday over the awarding of the World Cup to Qatar, a French judicial source confirmed to Reuters.

The detention and questioning of the former French soccer star was first reported by French investigative website Mediapart and Le Monde newspaper.

Prosecutors are investigation suspected corruption and bribery in the process of awarding the 2022 World Cup to Gulf emirate of Qatar.

(Reporting by Emmanuel Jarry, Inti Landauro and Sudip Kar-Gupta, Editing by Luke Baker)

Source: OANN

NBA: Toronto Raptors-Championship Parade
Jun 17, 2019; Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Toronto Raptors guard Kyle Lowry and team mates show off the Larry O’Brien trophy to fans during a parade through downtown Toronto to celebrate their NBA title. Mandatory Credit: Dan Hamilton-USA TODAY Sports

June 18, 2019

Four people sustained non-life-threatening gunshot wounds at Monday’s rally celebrating the Raptors’ championship, Toronto Police Chief Mark Saunders said.

Three arrests were made, according to Saunders, who added that the investigation was ongoing.

A reported 1.5 million parked Toronto’s downtown for the Raptors’ parade and subsequent rally at City Hall. The shootings occurred at Nathan Phillips Square, adjacent to City Hall. Addition people sustained minor injuries attempting to flee the scene after the shots were heard.

Mayor John Tory said in a statement, “It is disappointing and I’m sure a source of anger for more than just me that anyone would carry a gun and discharge it at what was otherwise a joyous celebration.”

–While the Raptors celebrated, the next chapter for the team sits in limbo based on the future of star forward Kawhi Leonard.

“Holding that trophy, there’s nothing more special than that,” Ed Rogers, chairman of Rogers Communications, partial owner of the Raptors, said at the rally. “The three of us are going to do everything we can to not make this a one-year thing, but make this a dynasty.”

Leonard will opt out of the final year of his contract to become a free agent. The Raptors expected this bit of paperwork even before Leonard was acquired from the San Antonio Spurs last summer. What they won’t know until at least June 30 is whether Leonard ever will wear a Toronto uniform again, and Leonard declined to offer any hints Monday.

–Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey said he isn’t concerned by reports of tension between James Harden and Chris Paul.

In a wide-ranging interview on ESPN Radio, Morey also disputed reports that Paul has asked to be traded and confirmed that he intends to come to contract terms with head coach Mike D’Antoni. As to an ESPN story that said there’s unrest between All-Stars Harden and Paul, Morey said the frustration stems from a desire to win.

“Two competitive superstars at that level, there’s going to be times when they are extremely competitive, extremely focused on how do we get to that next level, and when we don’t, there’s going to be frustration,” Morey said. “I’m frustrated, our top players are frustrated, Mike D’Antoni is frustrated. We want to take the last step and be the champion, and I think it’s good that there is tension in the sense that we all want to win.”

–The New Orleans Pelicans picked up the 2020-21 option for head coach Alvin Gentry, putting him under contract for the next two seasons.

Gentry, 64, has spent the past four seasons coaching the Pelicans, going 145-183 and leading the team to the second round of the playoffs in 2017-18.

The Pelicans went 33-49 this season. Anthony Davis requested a trade in the middle of the campaign and sat out or had his minutes limited for much of the second half.

–Pelicans forward Julius Randle will opt out of his $9.1 million player option for 2019-20, The Athletic reported.

The 6-foot-9 Randle signed a one-year contract with the Pelicans last summer that included the player option for 2019-20. With his expected opt-out, Randle and the Pelicans could negotiate a new deal, or Randle could pursue another team.

The Pelicans agreed to trade All-NBA star Davis to the Los Angeles Lakers for a hefty return of players and draft picks earlier this week. They now have the No. 1 and 4 overall picks in Thursday night’s draft, and they are expected to select Duke’s Zion Williamson with the top pick.

–Forward Rondae Hollis-Jefferson will be an unrestricted free agent this offseason after the Brooklyn Nets declined to make a qualifying offer, ESPN reported.

Hollis-Jefferson later tweeted: “Brooklynnnnn I Love You.. can’t believe it’s been 4 years ha.. Thank you”

Hollis-Jefferson, 24, averaged 9.9 points and 5.9 rebounds in four years with the Nets, who acquired him in a draft-night trade after the Portland Trail Blazers selected him with the 23rd pick in the 2015 draft. He started 147 of 234 games in Brooklyn, averaging a career-best 13.9 points in 2017-18.

–Field Level Media

Source: OANN

FILE PHOTO: U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thomas talks in his chambers at the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington
FILE PHOTO: U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas talks in his chambers at the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington, U.S. June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst/File Photo

June 18, 2019

By Jonathan Stempel

(Reuters) – Justice Clarence Thomas on Monday urged the U.S. Supreme Court to feel less bound to upholding precedent, advancing a view that if adopted by enough of his fellow justices could result in more past decisions being overruled, perhaps including the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion nationwide.

Writing in a gun possession case over whether the federal government and states can prosecute someone separately for the same crime, Thomas said the court should reconsider its standard for reviewing precedents.

Thomas said the nine justices should not uphold precedents that are “demonstrably erroneous,” regardless of whether other factors supported letting them stand.

“When faced with a demonstrably erroneous precedent, my rule is simple: We should not follow it,” wrote Thomas, who has long expressed a greater willingness than his colleagues to overrule precedents.

In a concurring opinion, which no other justice joined, Thomas referred to the court’s 1992 decision in Planned Parenthood v. Casey, which reaffirmed Roe and said states cannot place an undue burden on the constitutional right to an abortion recognized in the Roe decision. Thomas, a member of the court at the time, dissented from the Casey ruling.

Thomas, 70, joined the court in 1991 as an appointee of Republican President George H.W. Bush. Thomas is its longest-serving current justice.

The court now has a 5-4 conservative majority, and Thomas is among its most conservative justices.

He demonstrated his willingness to abandon precedent in February when he wrote that the court should reconsider its landmark 1964 New York Times v. Sullivan ruling that made it harder for public officials to win libel lawsuits.

“Thomas says legal questions have objectively correct answers, and judges should find them regardless of whether their colleagues or predecessors found different answers,” said Jonathan Entin, a law professor at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland. “Everyone is concerned about this because they’re thinking about Roe v. Wade.”

COURT DIVISIONS

The Thomas opinion focused on “stare decisis,” a Latin term referring to the legal principle that U.S. courts should not overturn precedents without a special reason.

While stare decisis (pronounced STAR-ay deh-SY-sis) has no formal parameters, justices deciding whether to uphold precedents often look at such factors as whether they work, enhance stability in the law, are part of the national fabric or promote reliance interests, such as in contract cases.

In 2000, conservative then-Chief Justice William Rehnquist left intact the landmark 1966 Miranda v. Arizona ruling, which required police to advise people in custody of their rights, including the rights to remain silent and have a lawyer.

Writing for a 7-2 majority, Rehnquist wrote that regardless of concerns about Miranda’s reasoning, “the principles of stare decisis weigh heavily against overruling it now.” Thomas joined Justice Antonin Scalia’s dissent from that decision. But even Scalia, a conservative who died in 2016, had a different view of stare decisis.

In a widely quoted comment, Scalia once told a Thomas biographer, Ken Foskett, that Thomas “doesn’t believe in stare decisis, period,” and that “if a constitutional line of authority is wrong, he would say let’s get it right. I wouldn’t do that.”

Stare decisis has also split the current court, including last month when in a 5-4 decision written by Thomas the justices overruled a 1979 precedent that had allowed states to be sued by private parties in courts of other states.

Justice Stephen Breyer, a member of the court’s liberal wing, dissented, faulting the majority for overruling “a well-reasoned decision that has caused no serious practical problems.” Citing the 1992 Casey ruling, Breyer said the May decision “can only cause one to wonder which cases the Court will overrule next.”

Thomas said the court should “restore” its jurisprudence relating to precedents to ensure it exercises “mere judgment” and focuses on the “correct, original meaning” of laws it interprets.

“In our constitutional structure, our rule of upholding the law’s original meaning is reason enough to correct course,” Thomas wrote.

Thomas also said demonstrably erroneous decisions should not be “elevated” over federal statutes, as well as the Constitution, merely because they are precedents.

“That’s very different from what the Court does today,” said John McGinnis, a law professor at Northwestern University in Chicago.

McGinnis said the thrust of Thomas’s opinion “makes clear that in a narrow area he will give some weight to precedent. But at the same time, he thinks cases have one right answer, and might find more cases ‘demonstrably erroneous.’”

(Reporting by Jonathan Stempel in New York; Editing by Will Dunham)

Source: OANN

A city that was thirsty to celebrate its first major professional sports title in more than a quarter century erupted in joy Monday, with tens of thousands of fans jammed on to the streets of downtown Toronto for the championship parade.

The parade was more than two hours behind schedule as the buses carrying the Raptors were held up by the massive amount of fans on the streets. Just after 2:20 p.m., the national anthem was played at Nathan Phillips Square with the crowd singing O Canada as the wait continued for the Raptors.

It was followed by a flyby from the Royal Canadian Air Force’s Snowbirds demonstration team.

The Raptors finally reached Nathan Phillips Square by 3 p.m., and the ceremony began about 30 minutes later.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW

The ceremony was delayed briefly as emcee Matt Devlin went on stage to urge the crowd to stay calm as police dealt with what he called an emergency.

Police tweeted that there were reports of a woman shot near the back of the square and people were running from area. Police later tweeted that they had found two victims with non life-threatening injuries. Two people were in custody and two firearms had been recovered.

The ceremony resumed by 3:55 p.m.

Earlier, Premier Doug Ford was roundly booed as he was introduced on the stage, while Prime Minister Justin Trudeau mostly received cheers.

The Raptors were introduced one by one during the ceremony, as most people in the square pulled out their smart phones, recording the ceremony on the stage.

Raptors superstar Kawhi Leonard came out last, serenaded with chants of “MVP, MVP, MVP!”

The fans then gave a rousing rendition of Queen’s “We Are The Champions” before the politicians began their speeches.

Toronto Raptors forward Kawhi Leonard holds the NBA Finals trophy at the victory parade Monday.

Mayor John Tory said the city would rename a part of Bremner Blvd. as Raptors Way. Tory also gave the team a key to the city, handing it to Leonard.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW

After the delay, the speeches continued from the team, including Raptors head coach Nick Nurse.

“I think it was Bono who said ‘the world needs more Canada,’ ” Nurse said to the crowd. “The world just got it!”

Raptors all-star guard Kyle Lowry was greeted with chants of “Lowry, Lowry.”

“We are now world champs together,” Lowry told the fans. “That’s all that really matters.”

Guard Fred VanVleet referenced the franchise’s past failures in the playoffs.

“You guys killed us when we got swept . . . you better celebrate this . . . all summer,” VanVleet said as the crowd roared.

Leonard, a two-time NBA Finals MVP, was introduced by Devlin as the “greatest player in the world.”

“Thank you, enjoy this moment and have fun with this,” said Leonard, who ended his brief remarks with “aha-ha-ha” — presumably mocking his infamous laugh from training camp — which had his teammates bursting with laughter.

Fans responded again by cheering “MVP, MVP, MVP!”

Raptors global ambassador Drake called this one of the most important shows of his life, and urged fans at the square to hug a stranger.

The ceremony wrapped up by about 4:20 p.m.

All day, chants of “Let’s go, Raptors” filled the square and the parade route as a huge crowd gathered to cheer on the team. Aerial footage from the parade showed spectacular shots of people jammed on the streets and in the square, which has a capacity of about 65,000.

The City of Toronto urged fans to head to Yonge-Dundas Square because Nathan Phillips Square was at capacity.

Commuters on public transit were surrounded by fans wearing Raptors gear, with the city swept up in excitement over the team’s NBA championship after defeating the Golden State Warriors last week.

The Burlington Post reported that local GO stations were mobbed as throngs of people commuted to Toronto to attend the parade. The TTC was forced to close Queen, Osgoode, Dundas stations just after 12:30 p.m. due to overcrowding at street level.

The Raptors travelled the parade route, which began at the Princes’ Gate at Exhibition Place, in five open-air double-decker buses. Lowry wore a Damon Stoudamire throwback jersey, a tribute to the franchise’s first superstar.

He was also carrying the Larry O’Brien Championship Trophy, given to the NBA champions.

Fans held signs urging Leonard, who could leave as a free agent at the end of the month, to stay with the Raptors.

A laughing Lowry led a chant of “five more years” for the fans to direct at Leonard as their bus slowly inched along the parade route, video from Yahoo Sports Canada shows.

One of the most clever signs was one that read “Board Man Gets Parade” a riff of what Leonard used to say in college (Board Man Gets Paid). Another sign read “Started from Bargnani, now we’re here.”

Leonard was smoking a cigar and wearing a shirt that said Board Man Gets Paid — his belief that to get into the NBA, you had to outwork an opponent because rebounds help you win games.

Amid the craziness as the procession headed to the square was a fan dubbed Plant Guy who handed over his “Kawh-actus” to Leonard as the crowd cheered. The plant was meant to be a “housewarming gift” to Leonard, in a video that went viral after the Raptors won.

All the streets near city hall were full of parents and their kids as well as men and women of all ages to celebrate a historic moment.

If you didn’t know Canada has legalized marijuana, you’re learning something in this crowd, the Star’s Laura Armstrong reports.

By noon, Toronto police said all viewing areas along the route of the Raptors parade were close to capacity, and urging fans to stay off the road so that the players and their floats can move along.

As Nathan Phillips Square filled to capacity, Toronto police tweeted that they’d set up a medical post on Bay St., just east of City Hall, for anyone feeling unwell.

Fire district chief Stephan Powell said firefighters were dealing with about a dozen calls for dehydration in the packed Nathan Phillips Square outside city hall.

Screenshot from Google Maps of the road closures due to the Raptors parade.

Toronto police Const. Jenifferjit Sidhu said several children were separated from their parents during the parade. She said police will bring the children to 52 Division to be reunited with their parents.

Sidhu said there were no reports of unruly fans or arrests.

Toronto police were trying to stop more people from entering the square. Some fans left, saying the crowd was getting rowdy.

Trudeau was with Raptors president Masai Ujiri at the square. Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer and NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh were also spotted in attendance.

Right in front of the stage at the square were three sisters from Hamilton, waiting patiently and anxiously for the celebrations to start at the square. They had been camping out here since 9 p.m. Sunday to ensure they have the best view of the players and celebrities.

“An epic moment,” said Christine Demesa, who along with her sisters Jen and Alexa were waving Raptors flags and donning NBA Champions hats.

“Turn up the music please. Let’s roll.”

Flags from Cameroon (where Pascal Siakam is from) and the Congo (for Serge Ibaka) could be spotted in the sea of people celebrating.

Share your thoughts:

Ronnie Gaffe said he drove in from Brampton and arrived in the city at 4 a.m.

“This is a chance of a lifetime,” he said as he recalled all the ups and downs he and other fans have been through for 25 years.

“I’m 55 and I was literally crying like a baby the night they won. So much emotions right now.”

There were safety concerns at the square as people climbed on to the arches to get a better view. Kids and people suffering from panic attacks were also pulled out of the crowd, the Star’s Bruce Arthur reports.

There were also safety concerns near the parade route, with cars pulled over on the Gardiner Expressway as motorists stopped and got out of their vehicles to watch the parade below on Lake Shore Blvd.

Read more:

Party first, contract later, Raptors’ Gasol says

The road to 16 wins: A series-by-series look at how the Toronto Raptors won their first NBA title

‘This isn’t real!’ Raptors fans camp out for championship parade

The area around the Princes’ Gates was jammed with fans jockeying for position, waiting to get a glimpse of their favourite players and the NBA championship trophy. The parade began there just before 10:30 a.m., and slowly headed to a rally at the square, scheduled to start at about 12:30 p.m.

The Fernandez family said they made the trip from Milton, and stayed at a nearby hotel Sunday night.

“It’s unbelievable,” said fan Aldrin Fernandes, while standing near the Princes’ Gates with his wife Tanya and children, Raphael, 7, and Shawn, 6.

“We couldn’t miss this moment because it could be once in a lifetime.”

Aldrin’s wife, Tanya, said the scene was “fantastic.”

“We’re going to follow the route as far as we can with the kids,” she said. “We’re super excited to get a glimpse of them.”

“I think we’re fans for life,” she added.

Mayor John Tory, who urged employers to give their workers time off to attend the celebrations, declared Monday “We The North Day” in Toronto.

Coronation Park, near Exhibition Place, hosted a viewing party to help relieve congestion.

The parade was scheduled to depart from the Princes’ Gates, heading east on Lake Shore Blvd., then north on York St. and University Ave. to Queen St. W., before ending at Nathan Phillips Square.

Lowry’s bus passed Bathurst St. at 12:10 p.m., so festivities were well behind schedule.

Raptors global ambassador Drake, who partied with the team in Las Vegas, was on one of the buses with Leonard, Lowry and VanVleet.

Another bus had Serge Ibaka, Jodie Meeks and Malcolm Miller.

Danny Green, Norman Powell and Chris Boucher were on another bus.

Bus No. 4 had Pascal Siakam, OG Anunoby and Patrick McCaw.

Bus No. 5 had Marc Gasol, Eric Moreland, Jeremy Lin and Jordan Loyd.

Superfan Nav Bhatia was the honorary parade marshal. Bhatia was at Princes’ Gate, snapping photos with fans as he rode around the grounds on a golf cart.

“It’s good for the city and good for the country,” said Bhatia, who said he was humbled by the outpouring of love for him.

“There is a lot of love flowing through here. This is amazing.”

The last time the city held a sports celebration of this magnitude was after the Toronto Blue Jays won the World Series in 1993. That parade saw fans climbing trees and statues on city streets to catch a glimpse of a team that included Joe Carter and Roberto Alomar.

Then-premier Bob Rae took part in those celebrations, flashing a sign that read “No speech today — Hooray for the Jays.” Current Premier Doug Ford has said he intends to watch this event with the masses.

His press secretary said Ford wants the day to be about the fans and players, not politicians.

The Golden State Warriors took a full-page ad in the Toronto Star on Monday to congratulate the Raptors on their NBA championship.

With files from The Canadian Press

Jason Miller is a breaking news reporter based in Toronto. Reach him on email: jasonmiller@thestar.ca or follow him on Twitter: @millermotionpic

Gilbert Ngabo is a breaking news reporter based in Toronto. Follow him on Twitter: @dugilbo

A city that was thirsty to celebrate its first major professional sports title in more than a quarter century erupted in joy Monday, with tens of thousands of fans jammed on to the streets of downtown Toronto for the championship parade.

The parade was more than two hours behind schedule as the buses carrying the Raptors were held up by the massive amount of fans on the streets. Just after 2:20 p.m., the national anthem was played at Nathan Phillips Square with the crowd singing O Canada as the wait continued for the Raptors.

It was followed by a flyby from the Royal Canadian Air Force’s Snowbirds demonstration team.

The Raptors finally reached Nathan Phillips Square by 3 p.m., and the ceremony began about 30 minutes later.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW

The ceremony was delayed briefly as emcee Matt Devlin went on stage to urge the crowd to stay calm as police dealt with what he called an emergency.

Police tweeted that there were reports of a woman shot near the back of the square and people were running from area. Police later tweeted that they had found two victims with non life-threatening injuries. Two people were in custody and two firearms had been recovered.

The ceremony resumed by 3:55 p.m.

Earlier, Premier Doug Ford was roundly booed as he was introduced on the stage, while Prime Minister Justin Trudeau mostly received cheers.

The Raptors were introduced one by one during the ceremony, as most people in the square pulled out their smart phones, recording the ceremony on the stage.

Raptors superstar Kawhi Leonard came out last, serenaded with chants of “MVP, MVP, MVP!”

The fans then gave a rousing rendition of Queen’s “We Are The Champions” before the politicians began their speeches.

Toronto Raptors forward Kawhi Leonard holds the NBA Finals trophy at the victory parade Monday.

Mayor John Tory said the city would rename a part of Bremner Blvd. as Raptors Way. Tory also gave the team a key to the city, handing it to Leonard.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW

After the delay, the speeches continued from the team, including Raptors head coach Nick Nurse.

“I think it was Bono who said ‘the world needs more Canada,’ ” Nurse said to the crowd. “The world just got it!”

Raptors all-star guard Kyle Lowry was greeted with chants of “Lowry, Lowry.”

“We are now world champs together,” Lowry told the fans. “That’s all that really matters.”

Guard Fred VanVleet referenced the franchise’s past failures in the playoffs.

“You guys killed us when we got swept . . . you better celebrate this . . . all summer,” VanVleet said as the crowd roared.

Leonard, a two-time NBA Finals MVP, was introduced by Devlin as the “greatest player in the world.”

“Thank you, enjoy this moment and have fun with this,” said Leonard, who ended his brief remarks with “aha-ha-ha” — presumably mocking his infamous laugh from training camp — which had his teammates bursting with laughter.

Fans responded again by cheering “MVP, MVP, MVP!”

Raptors global ambassador Drake called this one of the most important shows of his life, and urged fans at the square to hug a stranger.

The ceremony wrapped up by about 4:20 p.m.

All day, chants of “Let’s go, Raptors” filled the square and the parade route as a huge crowd gathered to cheer on the team. Aerial footage from the parade showed spectacular shots of people jammed on the streets and in the square, which has a capacity of about 65,000.

The City of Toronto urged fans to head to Yonge-Dundas Square because Nathan Phillips Square was at capacity.

Commuters on public transit were surrounded by fans wearing Raptors gear, with the city swept up in excitement over the team’s NBA championship after defeating the Golden State Warriors last week.

The Burlington Post reported that local GO stations were mobbed as throngs of people commuted to Toronto to attend the parade. The TTC was forced to close Queen, Osgoode, Dundas stations just after 12:30 p.m. due to overcrowding at street level.

The Raptors travelled the parade route, which began at the Princes’ Gate at Exhibition Place, in five open-air double-decker buses. Lowry wore a Damon Stoudamire throwback jersey, a tribute to the franchise’s first superstar.

He was also carrying the Larry O’Brien Championship Trophy, given to the NBA champions.

Fans held signs urging Leonard, who could leave as a free agent at the end of the month, to stay with the Raptors.

A laughing Lowry led a chant of “five more years” for the fans to direct at Leonard as their bus slowly inched along the parade route, video from Yahoo Sports Canada shows.

One of the most clever signs was one that read “Board Man Gets Parade” a riff of what Leonard used to say in college (Board Man Gets Paid). Another sign read “Started from Bargnani, now we’re here.”

Leonard was smoking a cigar and wearing a shirt that said Board Man Gets Paid — his belief that to get into the NBA, you had to outwork an opponent because rebounds help you win games.

Amid the craziness as the procession headed to the square was a fan dubbed Plant Guy who handed over his “Kawh-actus” to Leonard as the crowd cheered. The plant was meant to be a “housewarming gift” to Leonard, in a video that went viral after the Raptors won.

All the streets near city hall were full of parents and their kids as well as men and women of all ages to celebrate a historic moment.

If you didn’t know Canada has legalized marijuana, you’re learning something in this crowd, the Star’s Laura Armstrong reports.

By noon, Toronto police said all viewing areas along the route of the Raptors parade were close to capacity, and urging fans to stay off the road so that the players and their floats can move along.

As Nathan Phillips Square filled to capacity, Toronto police tweeted that they’d set up a medical post on Bay St., just east of City Hall, for anyone feeling unwell.

Fire district chief Stephan Powell said firefighters were dealing with about a dozen calls for dehydration in the packed Nathan Phillips Square outside city hall.

Screenshot from Google Maps of the road closures due to the Raptors parade.

Toronto police Const. Jenifferjit Sidhu said several children were separated from their parents during the parade. She said police will bring the children to 52 Division to be reunited with their parents.

Sidhu said there were no reports of unruly fans or arrests.

Toronto police were trying to stop more people from entering the square. Some fans left, saying the crowd was getting rowdy.

Trudeau was with Raptors president Masai Ujiri at the square. Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer and NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh were also spotted in attendance.

Right in front of the stage at the square were three sisters from Hamilton, waiting patiently and anxiously for the celebrations to start at the square. They had been camping out here since 9 p.m. Sunday to ensure they have the best view of the players and celebrities.

“An epic moment,” said Christine Demesa, who along with her sisters Jen and Alexa were waving Raptors flags and donning NBA Champions hats.

“Turn up the music please. Let’s roll.”

Flags from Cameroon (where Pascal Siakam is from) and the Congo (for Serge Ibaka) could be spotted in the sea of people celebrating.

Share your thoughts:

Ronnie Gaffe said he drove in from Brampton and arrived in the city at 4 a.m.

“This is a chance of a lifetime,” he said as he recalled all the ups and downs he and other fans have been through for 25 years.

“I’m 55 and I was literally crying like a baby the night they won. So much emotions right now.”

There were safety concerns at the square as people climbed on to the arches to get a better view. Kids and people suffering from panic attacks were also pulled out of the crowd, the Star’s Bruce Arthur reports.

There were also safety concerns near the parade route, with cars pulled over on the Gardiner Expressway as motorists stopped and got out of their vehicles to watch the parade below on Lake Shore Blvd.

Read more:

Party first, contract later, Raptors’ Gasol says

The road to 16 wins: A series-by-series look at how the Toronto Raptors won their first NBA title

‘This isn’t real!’ Raptors fans camp out for championship parade

The area around the Princes’ Gates was jammed with fans jockeying for position, waiting to get a glimpse of their favourite players and the NBA championship trophy. The parade began there just before 10:30 a.m., and slowly headed to a rally at the square, scheduled to start at about 12:30 p.m.

The Fernandez family said they made the trip from Milton, and stayed at a nearby hotel Sunday night.

“It’s unbelievable,” said fan Aldrin Fernandes, while standing near the Princes’ Gates with his wife Tanya and children, Raphael, 7, and Shawn, 6.

“We couldn’t miss this moment because it could be once in a lifetime.”

Aldrin’s wife, Tanya, said the scene was “fantastic.”

“We’re going to follow the route as far as we can with the kids,” she said. “We’re super excited to get a glimpse of them.”

“I think we’re fans for life,” she added.

Mayor John Tory, who urged employers to give their workers time off to attend the celebrations, declared Monday “We The North Day” in Toronto.

Coronation Park, near Exhibition Place, hosted a viewing party to help relieve congestion.

The parade was scheduled to depart from the Princes’ Gates, heading east on Lake Shore Blvd., then north on York St. and University Ave. to Queen St. W., before ending at Nathan Phillips Square.

Lowry’s bus passed Bathurst St. at 12:10 p.m., so festivities were well behind schedule.

Raptors global ambassador Drake, who partied with the team in Las Vegas, was on one of the buses with Leonard, Lowry and VanVleet.

Another bus had Serge Ibaka, Jodie Meeks and Malcolm Miller.

Danny Green, Norman Powell and Chris Boucher were on another bus.

Bus No. 4 had Pascal Siakam, OG Anunoby and Patrick McCaw.

Bus No. 5 had Marc Gasol, Eric Moreland, Jeremy Lin and Jordan Loyd.

Superfan Nav Bhatia was the honorary parade marshal. Bhatia was at Princes’ Gate, snapping photos with fans as he rode around the grounds on a golf cart.

“It’s good for the city and good for the country,” said Bhatia, who said he was humbled by the outpouring of love for him.

“There is a lot of love flowing through here. This is amazing.”

The last time the city held a sports celebration of this magnitude was after the Toronto Blue Jays won the World Series in 1993. That parade saw fans climbing trees and statues on city streets to catch a glimpse of a team that included Joe Carter and Roberto Alomar.

Then-premier Bob Rae took part in those celebrations, flashing a sign that read “No speech today — Hooray for the Jays.” Current Premier Doug Ford has said he intends to watch this event with the masses.

His press secretary said Ford wants the day to be about the fans and players, not politicians.

The Golden State Warriors took a full-page ad in the Toronto Star on Monday to congratulate the Raptors on their NBA championship.

With files from The Canadian Press

Jason Miller is a breaking news reporter based in Toronto. Reach him on email: jasonmiller@thestar.ca or follow him on Twitter: @millermotionpic

Gilbert Ngabo is a breaking news reporter based in Toronto. Follow him on Twitter: @dugilbo

Toronto police confirmed they located two victims with serious but non-life-threatening injuries and have two people in custody following reports of a shooting in the Nathan Phillips Square area at Bay St. and Albert St. Monday afternoon.

Toronto Const. David Hopkinson said police don’t believe there’s a threat to public safety right now.

Police tweeted earlier that they had two people in custody and recovered two firearms.

Hopkinson said the shooting situation was dealt with very quickly, and police made two arrests. Two victims were quickly found and are receiving medical attention.

Just before 4 p.m., police tweeted they had received reports of a woman shot near the back of the square and people were running from area.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW

The incident happened as huge crowds gathered to celebrate the Toronto Raptors’ NBA championship win. The city earlier said the square was at capacity.

Andrew Brown-Kerr, 25, of Brampton was in the crowd, standing under the arch at Nathan Phillips Square when he heard popping sounds that he said did not sound like fireworks.

“We tried our best to escape,” he said. “We saw a lady get trampled, a pregnant woman fall. We saw some kids getting trampled and parents trying to protect them.”

He and his friend were unharmed.

The ceremony was delayed briefly as emcee Matt Devlin went on stage to urge the crowd to stay calm as police dealt with what he called an emergency. The ceremony then resumed just before 4 p.m.

Police were also summoned to the Eaton Centre Plaza for reports of at least one stabbing following a fight with a group of men, police said Monday afternoon. Police have not said if the stabbing is connected in any way to the parade.

In a tweet, police said three men were stabbed and that none of the injuries are life-threatening; in a update, police said a stabbing victim in the same area suffered serious injuries and police are investigating, adding its not clear if the stabbings were two separate incidents.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW

With files from Wendy Gillis

Sherina Harris is a breaking news reporter, working out of the Star’s radio room in Toronto. Follow her on Twitter: @sherinaharris

Francine Kopun is a Toronto-based reporter covering city politics. Follow her on Twitter: @KopunF

Toronto police confirmed they located two victims with serious but non-life-threatening injuries and have two people in custody following reports of a shooting in the Nathan Phillips Square area at Bay St. and Albert St. Monday afternoon.

Toronto Const. David Hopkinson said police don’t believe there’s a threat to public safety right now.

Police tweeted earlier that they had two people in custody and recovered two firearms.

Hopkinson said the shooting situation was dealt with very quickly, and police made two arrests. Two victims were quickly found and are receiving medical attention.

Just before 4 p.m., police tweeted they had received reports of a woman shot near the back of the square and people were running from area.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW

The incident happened as huge crowds gathered to celebrate the Toronto Raptors’ NBA championship win. The city earlier said the square was at capacity.

Andrew Brown-Kerr, 25, of Brampton was in the crowd, standing under the arch at Nathan Phillips Square when he heard popping sounds that he said did not sound like fireworks.

“We tried our best to escape,” he said. “We saw a lady get trampled, a pregnant woman fall. We saw some kids getting trampled and parents trying to protect them.”

He and his friend were unharmed.

The ceremony was delayed briefly as emcee Matt Devlin went on stage to urge the crowd to stay calm as police dealt with what he called an emergency. The ceremony then resumed just before 4 p.m.

Police were also summoned to the Eaton Centre Plaza for reports of at least one stabbing following a fight with a group of men, police said Monday afternoon. Police have not said if the stabbing is connected in any way to the parade.

In a tweet, police said three men were stabbed and that none of the injuries are life-threatening; in a update, police said a stabbing victim in the same area suffered serious injuries and police are investigating, adding its not clear if the stabbings were two separate incidents.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW

With files from Wendy Gillis

Sherina Harris is a breaking news reporter, working out of the Star’s radio room in Toronto. Follow her on Twitter: @sherinaharris

Francine Kopun is a Toronto-based reporter covering city politics. Follow her on Twitter: @KopunF

Toronto fans watch a man climb down a poll as they fill the streets in front of the city hall, during the Toronto Raptors NBA Championship celebration parade at Nathan Phillips Square in Toronto
Toronto fans watch a man climb down a poll as they fill the streets in front of the city hall, during the Toronto Raptors NBA Championship celebration parade at Nathan Phillips Square in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, June 17, 2019. REUTERS/Hyungwon Kang

June 17, 2019

By Tyler Choi

TORONTO (Reuters) – Prime Minister Justin Trudeau was among 2 million fans cheering the NBA champion Toronto Raptors at a victory parade through the city on Monday that was briefly interrupted by nearby gunfire that injured two people and caused many attendees to scatter for safety.

Two people were seriously wounded during a shooting, but neither suffered life-threatening injuries, Toronto police said on Twitter. Two people have been taken into custody and two firearms were recovered, police said. The investigation is ongoing.

The shots were fired near Nathan Phillips Square, the parade’s final destination, causing a chaotic scene toward the back of the huge crowd. However, the incident caused only a brief pause in the celebratory speeches, which were still going on.

(Reporting by Tyler Choi; Additional reporting by Canice Leung and Steve Scherer; Editing by Denny Thomas, Bill Berkrot and Lisa Shumaker)

Source: OANN

(Reuters) – Justice Clarence Thomas on Monday urged the U.S. Supreme Court to feel less bound to upholding precedent, advancing a view that if adopted by enough of his fellow justices could result in more past decisions being overruled, perhaps including the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion nationwide.

FILE PHOTO: U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas talks in his chambers at the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington, U.S. June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst/File Photo

Writing in a gun possession case over whether the federal government and states can prosecute someone separately for the same crime, Thomas said the court should reconsider its standard for reviewing precedents.

Thomas said the nine justices should not uphold precedents that are “demonstrably erroneous,” regardless of whether other factors supported letting them stand.

“When faced with a demonstrably erroneous precedent, my rule is simple: We should not follow it,” wrote Thomas, who has long expressed a greater willingness than his colleagues to overrule precedents.

In a concurring opinion, which no other justice joined, Thomas referred to the court’s 1992 decision in Planned Parenthood v. Casey, which reaffirmed Roe and said states cannot place an undue burden on the constitutional right to an abortion recognized in the Roe decision. Thomas, a member of the court at the time, dissented from the Casey ruling.

Thomas, 70, joined the court in 1991 as an appointee of Republican President George H.W. Bush. Thomas is its longest-serving current justice.

The court now has a 5-4 conservative majority, and Thomas is among its most conservative justices.

He demonstrated his willingness to abandon precedent in February when he wrote that the court should reconsider its landmark 1964 New York Times v. Sullivan ruling that made it harder for public officials to win libel lawsuits.

“Thomas says legal questions have objectively correct answers, and judges should find them regardless of whether their colleagues or predecessors found different answers,” said Jonathan Entin, a law professor at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland. “Everyone is concerned about this because they’re thinking about Roe v. Wade.”

COURT DIVISIONS

The Thomas opinion focused on “stare decisis,” a Latin term referring to the legal principle that U.S. courts should not overturn precedents without a special reason.

While stare decisis (pronounced STAR-ay deh-SY-sis) has no formal parameters, justices deciding whether to uphold precedents often look at such factors as whether they work, enhance stability in the law, are part of the national fabric or promote reliance interests, such as in contract cases.

In 2000, conservative then-Chief Justice William Rehnquist left intact the landmark 1966 Miranda v. Arizona ruling, which required police to advise people in custody of their rights, including the rights to remain silent and have a lawyer.

Writing for a 7-2 majority, Rehnquist wrote that regardless of concerns about Miranda’s reasoning, “the principles of stare decisis weigh heavily against overruling it now.” Thomas joined Justice Antonin Scalia’s dissent from that decision. But even Scalia, a conservative who died in 2016, had a different view of stare decisis.

In a widely quoted comment, Scalia once told a Thomas biographer, Ken Foskett, that Thomas “doesn’t believe in stare decisis, period,” and that “if a constitutional line of authority is wrong, he would say let’s get it right. I wouldn’t do that.”

Stare decisis has also split the current court, including last month when in a 5-4 decision written by Thomas the justices overruled a 1979 precedent that had allowed states to be sued by private parties in courts of other states.

Justice Stephen Breyer, a member of the court’s liberal wing, dissented, faulting the majority for overruling “a well-reasoned decision that has caused no serious practical problems.” Citing the 1992 Casey ruling, Breyer said the May decision “can only cause one to wonder which cases the Court will overrule next.”

Thomas said the court should “restore” its jurisprudence relating to precedents to ensure it exercises “mere judgment” and focuses on the “correct, original meaning” of laws it interprets.

“In our constitutional structure, our rule of upholding the law’s original meaning is reason enough to correct course,” Thomas wrote.

Thomas also said demonstrably erroneous decisions should not be “elevated” over federal statutes, as well as the Constitution, merely because they are precedents.

“That’s very different from what the Court does today,” said John McGinnis, a law professor at Northwestern University in Chicago.

McGinnis said the thrust of Thomas’s opinion “makes clear that in a narrow area he will give some weight to precedent. But at the same time, he thinks cases have one right answer, and might find more cases ‘demonstrably erroneous.’”

Reporting by Jonathan Stempel in New York; Editing by Will Dunham

(Reuters) – Justice Clarence Thomas on Monday urged the U.S. Supreme Court to feel less bound to upholding precedent, advancing a view that if adopted by enough of his fellow justices could result in more past decisions being overruled, perhaps including the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion nationwide.

FILE PHOTO: U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas talks in his chambers at the U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington, U.S. June 6, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst/File Photo

Writing in a gun possession case over whether the federal government and states can prosecute someone separately for the same crime, Thomas said the court should reconsider its standard for reviewing precedents.

Thomas said the nine justices should not uphold precedents that are “demonstrably erroneous,” regardless of whether other factors supported letting them stand.

“When faced with a demonstrably erroneous precedent, my rule is simple: We should not follow it,” wrote Thomas, who has long expressed a greater willingness than his colleagues to overrule precedents.

In a concurring opinion, which no other justice joined, Thomas referred to the court’s 1992 decision in Planned Parenthood v. Casey, which reaffirmed Roe and said states cannot place an undue burden on the constitutional right to an abortion recognized in the Roe decision. Thomas, a member of the court at the time, dissented from the Casey ruling.

Thomas, 70, joined the court in 1991 as an appointee of Republican President George H.W. Bush. Thomas is its longest-serving current justice.

The court now has a 5-4 conservative majority, and Thomas is among its most conservative justices.

He demonstrated his willingness to abandon precedent in February when he wrote that the court should reconsider its landmark 1964 New York Times v. Sullivan ruling that made it harder for public officials to win libel lawsuits.

“Thomas says legal questions have objectively correct answers, and judges should find them regardless of whether their colleagues or predecessors found different answers,” said Jonathan Entin, a law professor at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland. “Everyone is concerned about this because they’re thinking about Roe v. Wade.”

COURT DIVISIONS

The Thomas opinion focused on “stare decisis,” a Latin term referring to the legal principle that U.S. courts should not overturn precedents without a special reason.

While stare decisis (pronounced STAR-ay deh-SY-sis) has no formal parameters, justices deciding whether to uphold precedents often look at such factors as whether they work, enhance stability in the law, are part of the national fabric or promote reliance interests, such as in contract cases.

In 2000, conservative then-Chief Justice William Rehnquist left intact the landmark 1966 Miranda v. Arizona ruling, which required police to advise people in custody of their rights, including the rights to remain silent and have a lawyer.

Writing for a 7-2 majority, Rehnquist wrote that regardless of concerns about Miranda’s reasoning, “the principles of stare decisis weigh heavily against overruling it now.” Thomas joined Justice Antonin Scalia’s dissent from that decision. But even Scalia, a conservative who died in 2016, had a different view of stare decisis.

In a widely quoted comment, Scalia once told a Thomas biographer, Ken Foskett, that Thomas “doesn’t believe in stare decisis, period,” and that “if a constitutional line of authority is wrong, he would say let’s get it right. I wouldn’t do that.”

Stare decisis has also split the current court, including last month when in a 5-4 decision written by Thomas the justices overruled a 1979 precedent that had allowed states to be sued by private parties in courts of other states.

Justice Stephen Breyer, a member of the court’s liberal wing, dissented, faulting the majority for overruling “a well-reasoned decision that has caused no serious practical problems.” Citing the 1992 Casey ruling, Breyer said the May decision “can only cause one to wonder which cases the Court will overrule next.”

Thomas said the court should “restore” its jurisprudence relating to precedents to ensure it exercises “mere judgment” and focuses on the “correct, original meaning” of laws it interprets.

“In our constitutional structure, our rule of upholding the law’s original meaning is reason enough to correct course,” Thomas wrote.

Thomas also said demonstrably erroneous decisions should not be “elevated” over federal statutes, as well as the Constitution, merely because they are precedents.

“That’s very different from what the Court does today,” said John McGinnis, a law professor at Northwestern University in Chicago.

McGinnis said the thrust of Thomas’s opinion “makes clear that in a narrow area he will give some weight to precedent. But at the same time, he thinks cases have one right answer, and might find more cases ‘demonstrably erroneous.’”

Reporting by Jonathan Stempel in New York; Editing by Will Dunham


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